There is positively a mania among some of them for sending it to | e-Book Preface - ePreface.com

There is positively a mania among some of them for sending it to England

There is positively a mania among some of them for sending it to England.” “That has a bad look,” said Darnay-- “A bad look, you say, my dear Darnay? Yes, but we don’t know what reason there is in it. People are so unreasonable! Some of us at Tellson’s are getting old, and we really can’t be troubled out of the ordinary course without due occasion.” “Still,” said Darnay, “you know how gloomy and threatening the sky is.” “I know that, to be sure,” assented Mr. Lorry, trying to persuade himself that his sweet temper was soured, and that he grumbled, “but I am determined to be peevish after my long day’s botheration. Where is Manette?” “Here he is,” said the Doctor, entering the dark room at the moment. Where is Manette?” “Here he is,” said the Doctor, entering the dark room at the moment.

You are not going out, I hope?” “No; I am going to play backgammon with you, if you like,” said the Doctor. “I don’t think I do like, if I may speak my mind. I am not fit to be pitted against you to-night. Is the teaboard still there, Lucie? I can’t see.” “Of course, it has been kept for you.” “Thank ye, my dear. The precious child is safe in bed?” “And sleeping soundly.” “That’s right; all safe and well! I don’t know why anything should be otherwise than safe and well here, thank God; but I have been so put out all day, and I am not as young as I was! My tea, my dear! Thank ye.

Now, come and take your place in the circle, and let us sit quiet, and hear the echoes about which you have your theory.” “Not a theory; it was a fancy.” “A fancy, then, my wise pet,” said Mr. Lorry, patting her hand. “They are very numerous and very loud, though, are they not? Only hear them!” Headlong, mad, and dangerous footsteps to force their way into anybody’s life, footsteps not easily made clean again if once stained red, the footsteps raging in Saint Antoine afar off, as the little circle sat in the dark London window. Saint Antoine had been, that morning, a vast dusky mass of scarecrows heaving to and fro, with frequent gleams of light above the billowy heads, where steel blades and bayonets shone in the sun. A tremendous roar arose from the throat of Saint Antoine, and a forest of naked arms struggled in the air like shrivelled branches of trees in a winter wind: all the fingers convulsively clutching at every weapon or semblance of a weapon that was thrown up from the depths below, no matter how far off. Who gave them out, whence they last came, where they began, through what agency they crookedly quivered and jerked, scores at a time, over the heads of the crowd, like a kind of lightning, no eye in the throng could have told; but, muskets were being distributed--so were cartridges, powder, and ball, bars of iron and wood, knives, axes, pikes, every weapon that distracted ingenuity could discover or devise. People who could lay hold of nothing else, set themselves with bleeding hands to force stones and bricks out of their places in walls. Every pulse and heart in Saint Antoine was on high-fever strain and at high-fever heat.

The Book Name And The Author A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens